Made by (Another) Hand

Craft brew and cart burrito

Craft brew and cart burrito

As much as I love to make stuff, there are (many) times when it is best for me to leave the handmade up to other hands.  Take Mexican food, one of my absolute favorites, and yet despite copious amounts of trial and authentic ingredients, mine never comes close to that of my favorite burrito stand.  Never.  This cart sits in a parking lot across the street from a busy truck stop and it is some of the best food I’ve ever eaten.  The owner makes everything from scratch and you can taste the difference.   Our idea of a big splurge is taking our growler for our a fill at our local brewery followed by a trip to the Mexican cart — both handmade with skill and care by another hand.  And, a note about food carts:  they are one of the easiest ways for a cook to open up a restaurant, being so much more affordable than a brick-and-mortar place.  Most of the best food I’ve ever eaten has come from a food truck.  Visit these and support local cooks.   You will be amazed at what crafty cooks are able to create in small spaces.

Middle Eastern handmade flatbread

Middle Eastern handmade flatbread

In addition to food carts, I love to shop at small ethnic markets.  You never know what kind of new-to-you ingredients you will find inside and I’ve found both the quality and price of food to be less than at conventional super stores.  Also, I really don’t like shopping at giant, fluorescent-lit stores with aisles of food all wrapped up in packages.  I prefer small, simple stores without hundreds of cereal varieties and chips overwhelming my senses.  Often you find fresh homemade food, too amongst the cans and bottles of ethnic markets.  Yesterday while venturing out in the nearby city,  I smelled something awesome and then I saw people walking out of a market with bags of baked goods.  I stopped in and got the last two pieces of flatbread made hours before.  I also got a couple pieces of baklava which I quickly ate on my way home, thus no photograph.  From the queso fresco and tortillas of our Mexican market, to the flash fried tofu we always cart back from the Asian supermarket in Portland, to this newly discovered pita palace, you will find people crafting incredible food by hand when you step away from the conventional supermarket.

 

Handwoven piece found at an antique store

Handwoven piece found at an antique store

And now from the fresh food of markets and carts to the old antique store,  what I love about perusing the piles of stuff in antique stores is again how much of what is there was made by hand.  As opposed to our current shops where everything is wrapped in plastic and cardboard and smells more toxic than new, antique shops are full of stuff that has already been used.  There is history and there is a lot of craft.  I love admiring the old handmade quilts, all of the carved furniture, the pottery and knowing that these things have and will continue to be useful.  Recently I found this amazing woven piece at an antique shop.  If you think that knitting or quilting is time consuming, try weaving!  This piece is obviously handmade and required hours of work.  Right now it is draped at the edge of the bed, but I think it would be great hung on a wall, that is as soon as I can create a means to hang it without the risk of creating a snag.  I am not a weaver, but I truly appreciate the time that some unknown person took to make this.  And I’m glad that I give this piece another life in another space.

Handmade crafts are not gone, there is no need to lament its disappearance in our age of mass production.  There are handmade things everywhere, you just need to look elsewhere and not the big box stores.  By choosing to support the handmade in life,  you’ll get more than just some thing, you’ll support craftspeople.

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How About Them Apples?

The quilt in all it's apple-y glory!

The quilt in all it’s apple-y glory!

Okay, I am getting sucked into quilting.  I was warned that it could happen and although I felt that my life was pretty darn full of hobbies already, it has happened swiftly and now I spend my time hunched over a ruler or my sewing machine.

Back in the Fall, I signed up for an Apple Block exchange at the quilt shop.  The swap meant that you picked a color (either green, red or yellow) and crafted 12 blocks.  We then met up for a block exchange and traded them out; you left with an array of blocks in unique fabrics.  It is a great concept: your  own blocks are now out in the universe on someone else’s quilt, a very community oriented way of quilting.

The original pattern called for a wall hanging, but I decided instead to create a lap sized quilt for my mom for Christmas.  I had to create a pattern from almost scratch, using the pea quilt as a template.  Again, thank goodness for the refresher in 6th grade math last year!

As the quilt was a mixture of all sorts of fabrics, I wanted to do a bright border and chose some 1930s reproduction fabrics.  The border fabrics really brightened up the quilt and make it look almost whimsical.  I could have gone kitschy and picked out some apple fabric, but I’m really happy with what the borders showcase on the apples.  For this quilt, I wanted to splurge, and support my local quilt shop, so I had the blanket long-arm quilted.  The pattern was leafy yet subtle and really made the blanket even more special.

An apple up close

An apple up close

The apple quilt now resides at my mom’s house, draped on a quilt rack where I know she admires it every day.